Τρίτη, 5 Απριλίου 2016

"PLEIADES"- BRIEF REPORT ON MALAKASA CAMP





Malakasa Refugee Camp


A Brief Report on Living Conditions
Based on information available on April 5, 2016

















Table of Contents


1            General

1.1      Introduction

The document describes the living conditions in Malakasa camp in Attica region, Greece.

1.2      Terminology

Term
Description
Remarks



1.3      References

Ref.
Document
Document location
[1]      
Practical Guide to the Systematic Use of Standards & Indicators in UNHCR Operations
http://www.unhcr.org/40eaa9804.pdf

1.4      Disclaimer

Unless otherwise specified, the document reports information available on April 5, 2016.
Due to rapidly changing circumstances, the absence of official data and inconsistencies identified across a multiplicity of (unofficial) sources, data accuracy and completeness may not be guaranteed. However, all information is reported to the best knowledge of the author, given in good faith, and selected across sources (including onsite witnesses) and media deemed reliable.

2            Malakasa Camp

2.1      Living Conditions

2.1.1       General

Malakasa is an emergency reception site in Attica region of Greece.
The site opened on March 8, 2016.
Although the initially planned capacity was 4,000, currently the maximum capacity of the camp is reported to by 1,000.
The camp is managed by the army. Kids are seen playing alongside soldiers who patrol the site with weapons in their hands.
According to UNHCR sources, a mobile UNHCR team is assigned to the camp.
Refugees are permitted temporary exit from the camp upon request.
Small crimes are being reported, such as theft of chickens from local farms.
Alcohol smuggling and marketing in the camp is spreading.
There is an urgent and great need for volunteers helping at the camp.
It is denounced that on March 31, 2016, lawyers from the “Greek Council for the Refugees” who planned to visit the site following an invitation by the local Team of Solidarity were denied access to the camp. Purpose of the planned visit was to brief the refugees with information on the subjects of asylum application, consequences of the EU-Turkey agreement.

2.1.2       Number of People at the Camp

According to UNHCR data latest updated on April 3, 2016, currently 1,118 people are living at the camp, therefore exceeding by 118 the camp’s current capacity.
On March 16, 2016, when the population at the camp was around 800, the majority of the people were families of Afghan citizenship and 200 unaccompanied children.
According to latest information available on April 3, 2016, Afghans are still the majority of the population at the camp.
The presence of refugees of Iranian nationality is also recorded.
There are no updates regarding the present population’s distribution in terms of sex and age. However, the presence of many women (including more than 50 pregnant women), children, infants, disabled people (including a quadriplegic girl) and teens is reported.
According to latest reports from Piraeus port in Athens, there is an ongoing attempt to transfer additional 300 Afghans from the port informal settlement at the passengers’ terminal to Malakasa.

2.1.3       Food

Three meals per day provided by the Greek army.
On April 5, 2016, it was reported that refugees returning to the camp were found with chickens stolen from local farms.

2.1.4       Health

According to information available on March 16, 2016, there is inadequate medical assistance.
A later report dated April 3, 2016, confirmed the urgent need for doctors (including women’s health specialists) and midwives.
On March 30, 2016, a miscarriage was reported.

2.1.5       Water

No information available.

2.1.6       Sanitation

No information regarding the number of toilets or the presence of showers.
The camp was not equipped with toilets accessible by people disabled or with mobility problems. When a quadriplegic girl arrived at the camp with her family, the army faced difficulties in providing a toilet suitable for disabled access due to the asking price of a suitable provider identified (300 euros per month, 2,400 euros to be paid in advance). The effort of the army personnel managed to solve the problem internally. However, this brings to attention the absence of planning for facilities accessible to the disabled in the construction of reception sites.

2.1.7       Shelter

People sleep in tents with no floor, in sleeping bags or over blankets placed on the ground.
There are about 10 people per tent.
Tents have no heating.

2.1.8       Environment

The camp is an open site field, with few small buildings used as warehouses.
The site ground becomes muddy and swampy when rainy weather occurs.
The camp is managed by the army. Kids are seen playing alongside soldiers who patrol the site with weapons in their hands.

2.1.9       Photographs





Παρασκευή, 1 Απριλίου 2016

KATSIKAS CAMP: ΔΕΛΤΙΟ ΤΥΠΟΥ ΔΗΜΟΥ ΙΩΑΝΝΙΤΩΝ ΓΙΑ ΤΟ ΚΕΝΤΡΟ ΦΙΛΟΞΕΝΙΑΣ


ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΗ ΔΗΜΟΚΡΑΤΙΑ
ΔΗΜΟΣ ΙΩΑΝΝΙΤΩΝ
ΓΡΑΦΕΙΟ ΤΥΠΟΥ


Δ/ΝΣΗ: ΠΛ. Α. Παπανδρέου 5
45221 – ΙΩΑΝΝΙΝΑ
ΤΗΛ.: 2651 3 61108
Fax:   2651 0 26355

                                                                                                   Ιωάννινα 1/4/2016

Πρέπει να σταματήσει η ροή προσφύγων στον Κατσικά – Επείγει η αντιμετώπιση των συνθηκών υγιεινής στο κέντρο φιλοξενίας

Επείγουσα προτεραιότητα για το Δήμο Ιωαννιτών είναι η αντιμετώπιση των συνθηκών υγιεινής, αξιοπρεπούς διαβίωσης και ασφάλειας στο Κέντρο Φιλοξενίας Προσφύγων του Κατσικά και πρέπει να σταματήσει η ροή προσφύγων στον καταυλισμό,  πριν αντιμετωπιστούν αυτά τα ζητήματα.
Αυτή τη θέση διατύπωσε ξεκάθαρα στη σημερινή συνεδρίαση του Τοπικού Συντονιστικού Οργάνου, ο Δήμαρχος Ιωαννιτών, μια θέση που δημοσιοποίησε με δηλώσεις του που ακολούθησαν, ενώ θα αποστείλει σχετική επιστολή διαμαρτυρίας στον Αναπληρωτή Υπουργό Εθνικής Άμυνας κ. Βίτσα, καθώς παρά την ξεκάθαρη θέση που έχει διατυπώσει ο Δήμος, οι προσφυγικές ροές συνεχίζονται.
Αυτό σε καμία περίπτωση «δεν σημαίνει αλλαγή προθέσεων του δήμου να βοηθήσει στην υπόθεση του προσφυγικού», όπως ξεκαθάρισε σαφώς ο κ. Μπέγκας, αλλά – όπως είπε- «διαμαρτυρόμαστε γιατί  θεωρούμε πως πρώτα πρέπει να αντιμετωπιστούν τα θέματα υγιεινής, διαβίωσης και ασφάλειας. Πρέπει να σταματήσει η ροή των προσφύγων και να ολοκληρώσουμε πλήρως ότι διαδικασίες έχουν σχέση με αυτά τα θέματα. Αυτό είναι η πρώτη προτεραιότητα πριν ληφθούν οι οποιεσδήποτε αποφάσεις».

Αφίξεις προσφύγων χωρίς να έχουν λυθεί σοβαρά προβλήματα

Στη σημερινή συνεδρίαση του Τοπικού Συντονιστικού  Οργάνου από την πλευρά του Δήμου συμμετείχαν ο Δήμαρχος, Θωμάς Μπέγκας, ο Αντιδήμαρχος Κοινωνικής Πολιτικής, Παντελής Κολόκας και ο Πρόεδρος του ΟΚΠΑΠΑ, Φίλιππος Τσουμάνης, όπου κατέθεσαν από την πλευρά του Δήμου συγκεκριμένες προτάσεις για το πώς θα αντιμετωπιστούν τα θέματα υγιεινής του καταυλισμού. 
Ο Δήμαρχος Ιωααννίνων παραβρέθηκε προσωπικά στη συνεδρίαση του Τοπικού Συντονιστικού, για να τονίσει ότι «δεν πρέπει να γίνει ούτε μία νέα άφιξη στον καταυλισμό του Κατσικά πριν διασφαλιστούν πλήρως οι συνθήκες υγιεινής του χώρου και οι συνθήκες της δημόσιας υγείας».
Όπως είπε, «χθες βράδυ εκτάκτως έφθασαν περίπου 200 πρόσφυγες στον Κατσικά και από πληροφορίες που μας έχουν έρθει, μαθαίνουμε ότι σήμερα αναμένονται κι άλλα 500 άτομα. Τονίζω με σημασία τη λέξη πληροφορίες, γιατί ούτε καν στους συμμετέχοντες στο Τοπικό Συντονιστικό δεν φτάνει έγκαιρα η πληροφορία για το πότε και πόσοι έρχονται», είπε στις δηλώσεις του ο Δήμαρχος .
Παρεμπιπτόντως και με αφορμή την άρνηση των 200 προσφύγων που αφίχθησαν χθες το βράδυ να κατεβούν από τα λεωφορεία, σημείωσε πως «έ χει σημασία ακόμη και ο χρόνος άφιξης των προσφύγων στον καταυλισμό. Καταφθάνουν πάντα αργά το βράδυ και αντιλαμβάνεστε ότι είναι λάθος χρόνος. Ο άνθρωπος όταν φτάνει σε ένα ξένο χώρο και δεν ξέρει που βρίσκεται και τι περιμένει, καταλαβαίνεται ότι «αγριεύεται». Θα πρέπει να προγραμματίζεται η μεταφορά έτσι ώστε να φθάνουν την ημέρα».
Ο κ. Μπέγκας συνέχισε λέγοντας:
«Νομίζω ότι έχουν συνειδητοποιήσει όλοι πλέον πως ο καταυλισμός στον Κατσικά είναι ένας χώρος που προσφέρει δύσκολα φιλοξενία, αλλά εν πάση περιπτώσει πριν αφιχθούν και άλλοι πρόσφυγες, θα πρέπει να διασφαλίσουμε συνθήκες αξιοπρέπειας  στους φιλοξενούμενους.
Αν δεν πετύχουμε συνθήκες υγιεινής και αξιοπρέπειας έγκαιρα, θα υπάρχει ένταση που δεν είναι για καλό κανενός. Αν δράσουμε τώρα είναι πρόληψη, αν το αφήσουμε για μεταγενέστερο χρόνο θα είναι αργά».
Ο Αντιδήμαρχος Παντελής Κολόκας, ανέφερε πως «έχουμε πληροφορίες που τις μεταφέραμε και στο συντονιστικό, ότι κάποιοι πληροφορούν τους πρόσφυγες στον Πειραιά ότι οι συνθήκες στον Κατσικά είναι ιδανικές προκειμένου να μεταφερθούν εδώ. Αυτό πρέπει να διερευνηθεί».


Το παράδειγμα της καλής πρακτικής
και η ανάγκη να υπάρξουν κανόνες


Στις δηλώσεις του ο Δήμαρχος Ιωαννίνων τόνισε πως ο Δήμος και όλοι οι τοπικοί φορείς, ολόκληρη  η κοινωνία, «δώσαμε όλες μας τις δυνάμεις και σταθήκαμε δίπλα στην προσπάθεια που γίνεται για να αντιμετωπιστεί το προσφυγικό πρόβλημα. Ξέρετε πολύ καλά ότι ως Δήμος είμαστε δίπλα στον καταυλισμό από την πρώτη στιγμή. Και με την προσωπική μου παρουσία, την παρουσία των αντιδημάρχων και δίνοντας κάθε βοήθεια για να αντιμετωπιστούν τα προβλήματα.
Αυτό δεν μπορεί να βασίζεται όμως μόνο στη διάθεση των τοπικών φορέων και των εθελοντών. Αυτή η ιστορία πρέπει να αποκτήσει κανόνες, προτεραιότητες, διαδικασίες. Και όλα αυτά να είναι σαφή. Πράγμα που μέχρι σήμερα δεν συμβαίνει».
Ο κ. Μπέγκας στάθηκε ιδιαίτερα στο ζήτημα της αξιοπρέπειας που πρέπει να διασφαλιστεί για τους πρόσφυγες στον καταυλισμό του Κατσικά κι ανέφερε ως παράδειγμα καλής πρακτικής που πρέπει να υιοθετηθεί γενικότερα, των τρόπο που αντιμετώπισε ο Δήμος Ιωαννιτών και οι εθελοντές, το θέμα της ανθρωπιστικής βοήθειας στους πρόσφυγες.
Όπως είπε ο κ. Μπέγκας, οι άνθρωποι μιας  συγκεκριμένης δομής του Δήμου, του Ζωγράφειου Οίκου Ευγηρίας, μαζί με δεκάδες εθελοντές  στο πλευρό τους, χωρίς να υπάρχει καμία ανάλογη εμπειρία, έστησαν μέσα σε μια μέρα ένα Κέντρο Οργάνωσης της Βοήθειας κι έφεραν σε πέρας μια σπουδαία δουλειά. Όχι μόνο παραλαβής και ταξινόμησης της βοήθειας αλλά και καταγραφής της ανάγκης του κάθε πρόσφυγα ώστε να παραδίδεται στη σκηνή του καθενός το δέμα του, με συνθήκες αξιοπρέπειας και χωρίς να περιμένει στην ουρά με απλωμένο χέρι. 
«Ευχαριστώ την Αντιπρόεδρο του Οίκου Ευγηρίας, Ντίνα Μπακόλα, όλα τα μέλη του Διοικητικού Συμβουλίου και το προσωπικού του Οίκου και όλους τους εθελοντές που βοήθησαν και συνεχίζουν να βοηθούν», είπε ο Δήμαρχος.

Διαμαρτυρία για την υπόθεση της σίτισης του καταυλισμού

Με αφορμή το διαγωνισμό σίτισης των προσφύγων του Κέντρου Φιλοξενίας στον Κατσικά που ανέδειξε επιχείρηση από την Κόρινθο, ο Δήμαρχος Ιωαννίνων εξέφρασε τη διαμαρτυρία του για τον τρόπο που χειρίζεται η πολιτεία τα θέματα αυτά.

«Η πολιτεία οφείλει να βρει τον τρόπο που θα διευκολύνει τις τοπικές επιχειρήσεις να συμμετέχουν σε αυτές τις διαδικασίες. Αν το θελήσει κι αν αναγνωρίζει την προσφορά των ντόπιων ανθρώπων σε όλη αυτή την προσπάθεια του προσφυγικού, είναι βέβαιο ότι μπορεί να βρει διαγωνιστικές διαδικασίες που θα εξασφαλίζουν την συμμετοχή των τοπικών επιχειρήσεων, όπως για παράδειγμα να πάει σε διαγωνισμούς μικρότερους ή κατά είδος», δήλωσε ο κ. Μπέγκας.  

Τρίτη, 29 Μαρτίου 2016

Pleiades Report: "Refugee Camps in Northern Greece - living conditions"




 "Pleiades" -Hellenic Action for Human Rights


Refugee Camps


in Northern Greece
A Brief Report on Living Conditions
Based on information available on March 29, 2016






 Table of Contents


1            General

1.1      Introduction

The document contains a brief report on the living conditions in the refugee camps in Northern Greece.

1.2      Terminology

Term
Description
Remarks
Rub hall
The term rub hall is used generically to describe a particularly large, relocatable tent-like structure.
Also referred to as Rubb hall.

1.3      References

Ref.
Document
Document location
[1]    
Practical Guide to the Systematic Use of Standards & Indicators in UNHCR Operations
http://www.unhcr.org/40eaa9804.pdf
[2]    
Letter by Vitsa Dimitrios, Deputy Minister of Defense, in response to a letter by Nicholas Kalantzi, Mayor of the Municipality of Ziros (date unknown – estimated early March 2016, according to date of sources)
http://www.atpreveza.gr/index.php/news/koinonia/item/18369-filippiuada-opos-sxisto-diavata-nea-kavala.html

1.4      Disclaimer

Unless otherwise specified, the document reports information available on March 29, 2016.
Due to rapidly changing circumstances, the absence of official data and inconsistencies identified across a multiplicity of (unofficial) sources, data accuracy and completeness may not be guaranteed. However, all information is reported to the best knowledge of the author, given in good faith, and selected across sources (including onsite witnesses) and media deemed reliable.

2            Camps in Northern Greece

2.1      General – Safety, Security, Protection

The following issues are highlighted as critical,
·         According to a UNHCR report dated 28th March 2016, 45,476 people are currently present in Greece mainland, therefore exceeding by 13,916 the maximum total capacity of 31,560.
·         Given the poor living conditions in the camps as well as the camps’ overcrowding (or insufficient framework), makeshift camps/informal settlements are reported in various rural and non-rural areas.
·         At Piraeus port in Athens, more than 5,000 people have been living at the passengers’ terminal (gate E1) and in camping tents. Hygienic conditions are poor. Many children and vulnerable categories (disabled, pregnant women, elderly) require special assistance and medical care. The presence of smugglers and human traffickers threatening the safety of both refugees and volunteers is reported.
·         People are receiving limited or no assistance and inconsistent advice. Furthermore, they face de facto impossibility to exert their rights due to a number of factors, among which: 1) The possibility to submit asylum application directly to UNHCR is reported possible at the port of Athens only; 2) It is necessary to contact the European Asylum Support Office (EASO) via Skype in order to obtain an appointment with asylum service in order to apply for asylum / EU relocation program / Family reunion, whereas WiFi connectivity is not guaranteed in the camps; 3) The EASO Skype numbers are reported to be not reachable or unattended (no answer).
·         Riots were reported in Idomeni. The living conditions and the unavailability of clear information are deemed to exacerbate the tension across the various ethnic groups at the camp.
·         The ethnic minority Yazidis is particularly vulnerable and people are negatively affected by the lack of protection in their daily life and in their access to basic services. In particular, they are reported to live in fear in more than one camp, afraid to join lines in food distribution, and subject to violent attacks by Syrian gangs at night. Police would not assist because the matter is deemed too sensitive and political. The issue is known in Idomeni and Nea Kavala.
·         Children live in an unsuitable and hazardous environment, exposed to diseases and infections as well as potential abuses.
·         Women feel increasingly unsafe.
·         Women’s health needs are neglected. In Giannitsa, a pregnant woman ill with cancer needs urgent assistance (March 23, 2016). Furthermore, female medical doctors to be provided.
·         Birth control devices/contraceptives are not provided.
·         Cases of attempted suicide reported in various locations.
·         Fires spread in more than one camp. Their nature was not always identified.
·         There are no interpreters and people often communicate with volunteers and the military through sign language. Furthermore, according to the UNHCR's Voulgaris, mismatched birth dates, along with variations in the spellings of Arabic names, have often caused delays and issues with official processes.
·         Doctors are insufficient (absent in some camps) and the risk of infections spreading is reported high in all the camps. In Giannitsa, the ground is infested with larvae (March 23, 2016).
·         Babies are reported born without assistance. In Elliniko camp (Attika region) a baby died of birth complications because no assistance was provided despite several requests raised by volunteers to take the woman in labour to the hospital.
·         Management of camps varies greatly (military versus NGO; access to volunteers; access to journalists and media; handling of humanitarian aids), thus unnecessarily increasing the inherent difficulties.
·         The number of latrines is reported insufficient for the number of people and families in most camps, with consequent spreading of unsanitary habits and contamination of ground and living environment.
·         The number of water taps is reported insufficient for the number of people and families in most camps. People shower pouring water from cans, small recipients, plastic bottles.
As a term of reference, it is deemed relevant to highlight that according to a report dated March 11, 2016 (including a letter by Vitsa Dimitrios, Deputy Minister of Defense, in response to a letter by Nicholas Kalantzi, Mayor of the Municipality of Ziros),
·         Camps are open and supervised accommodation structures. This means that the guests/’s families have been identified in the islands, recorded at entry and enter or leave the center based on the identification document and proof of registration. No other refugee or Greek enters the center without the proper license can be issued by the head of the center or the appropriate municipality.
·         Guests refugees staying in rooms (prefabricated buildings or tents) and food is
·         There is a permanent health unit of the Ministry of Health
·         There are interpreters from the Department of Migration Policy
·         There is refugees information service specialist clerk for children
Sanitization and cleaning of provided toilets is unclear. Agreements to be undertaken by the municipality in agreement with the manager of the center.

Figure 1 Informal settlement at Hotel Hara in Evzonoi, near Idomeni (1)

Figure 2 Informal settlement at Kaoil gas station in Evzonoi, near Idomeni (2)

2.2      Cherso

2.2.1       General

According to two different reports, No NGO presence. Only private volunteers.
A team of about 50 volunteers are currently trying to establish an efficient and methodical goods distribution system to for clothes and toiletries. Packages per tent are being prepared based on actual needs to both provide humane support and reduce waste.
The UNHCR came a few days ago, walked around and left. The relocation registration promised in Idomeni by the UNHCR consists in one abandoned small white booth, forgotten in a desolate corner of the camp, next to the military quarters’ tent. The empty booth signals the wider fact that there is simply no one to talk to, to speak about your options as a refugee there. And it is yet another hint that the relocation program, however much it is spoken about, is nowhere to be found. Cherso camp is in the middle of nowhere, secluded from any form of support, whether humanitarian or legal.
Additional information in the attached document, a travelogue dated March 16, 2016:

2.2.2       Number of People at the Camp

Capacity: 4,000.
UNHCR data available on March 26, 2016: 3,900 people.
Refugee Aid Information data available on March 28, 2016: 3,900 people.

2.2.3       Food

Reported on March 13, 2016. “The food that has been distributed there for the past days was cold and out of date.
2,877 portions (breakfast-lunch-dinner) reported distributed on March 4, 2016.

2.2.4       Health

People do not know how to cope with infections and infected hands resulting from contact with infected materials and unsanitary environment. The risk of transmission of infectious diseases is high.
Many people ill with cold and flu.
According to DPA, The German Red Cross, in cooperation with the Red Cross of Finland, is on the move to come down to Idomeni with two complete field hospital units. They will include an operating room for surgery, special facilities for giving birth, a laboratory and a freezer room. The German Red Cross says the units will arrive near Idomeni on March 20, 2016 (information available on March 18 – no updates available) and will be operational in Nea Kavala and Cherso on March 22, 2016.

2.2.5       Water

No information available.

2.2.6       Sanitation

20 toilets and showers.
Insufficient for the number of people, some tents were converted into toilets.

2.2.7       Shelter

According to report dated March 4, 2016, the camp has 510 tents with capacity for 6-8 people and 3 rub halls.

2.2.8       Environment

1 solar panel.
The ground is reduced to mud due to the recent bad weather.
There is trash everywhere.

2.2.9       Photographs

Figure 3 Cherso camp tents

Figure 4 Cherso camp rocky ground and flooding upon adverse weather conditions
Figure 5 Cherso camp flooding upon bad weather conditions

Figure 6 Cherso camp environment
Figure 7 Cherso camp unsanitary environment

2.3      Diavata

2.3.1       General

Former military facility managed by the army.

2.3.2       Number of People at the Camp

Capacity: 2,500.
UNHCR data available on March 26, 2016: 2,280 people.
Refugee Aid Information data available on March 28, 2016: 2,280 people.

2.3.3       Food

Two meals per day provided by the army.
2,200 portions (breakfast-lunch-dinner) reported distributed on March 4, 2016.

2.3.4       Health

No information available.

2.3.5       Water

Running water available. Exact number is currently not known.

2.3.6       Sanitation

Toilets and showers available. Exact number is currently not known.

2.3.7       Shelter

Containers and tents.

2.3.8       Environment

Former military facility with containers and tents.

2.3.9       Photographs

No photographs available.

2.4      Filippiada

2.4.1       General

The camp is located in the north west of the mainland, about 20 minutes from the nearest town.
Open facility controlled by the military. The army appears to show openness to the presence of volunteers at the camp (no volunteers on March 23, 2016).
No NGO presence on March 23, 2016. There is hope/expectation that UN and Oxfam shall intervene for long-term planning and projects.
No media presence.
Refugees receive no information. On March 23, 2016, many are reported believing that FYROM border is open.
No Internet connectivity.
Needs reported:
- UNHCR presence,
- Long-term projects,
- Information point/centre,
- WiFi Internet connectivity,
- Medical personnel,
- Children’s recreation,
- More tents for miscellaneous uses (women’s area, children’s area),
- Translators: Arabic and Farsi (a few good English speakers among the refugees acting as interpreters on March 23, 2016),
- Volunteers, including experienced volunteers for coordinating team members and taking care of the delicate relationship with the military,
- Entertainment for children,
- Teachers,
- Clothes and shoes, especially for children,
- Laundry facilities (refugees are unable to wash clothes),
- Garbage facilities,
- Means of transport to reach the nearest town.

2.4.2       Number of People at the Camp

Population is largely Afghan men and Syrian families. Tensions are reported.
Vulnerable categories present: pregnant women, children, women with children and no husband.
Cases of sexual harassment reported (March 24, 2016: Afghan refugees against Syrian woman). Women report to feel unsafe.
Capacity: 700.
UNHCR data available on March 26, 2016: 660 people.
Refugee Aid Information data available on March 28, 2016: 660 people.

2.4.3       Food

Food is catered but reported insufficient. Small portions; some people get multiple servings, some are left without food.
Remarks:
·         Empty paint tins reported being used to boil water over open fires/makeshift ovens.
·         Limited power sources limit the possibility of alternatives (e.g. electric kettle).

2.4.4       Health

March 27, 2016.
·         Urgent need of doctors and nurses, and especially paediatricians and midwives due to the presence of many children and at least 10 pregnant women.
·         At the present date, one doctor visits the camp twice a week.
·         It is required that a female doctor is available for women.
·         The head of the camp reports that vaccinations are needed for the staff of the camp.

2.4.5       Water

Information regarding the number of water taps is unavailable.
Drinking water provided.

2.4.6       Sanitation

50 portable toilets. No water in some toilets.
15 showers.
No hot water.
Cleaning services three times a day according to the head of the camp (Vergos); only once a day according to the refugees.

2.4.7       Shelter

Tents require flooring as people currently sleep on the nude ground/rocks.
No lighting in the tents.
Limited power boards for telephone charging.
A large warehouse is present and used for the food distribution.

2.4.8       Environment

No tables or chairs. Impaired social interaction.
Rocky, flat surface surrounded by land and mountains. Far from other human settlements.
Reported the presence of hazardous materials threatening the safety of children.

2.4.9       Photographs

Figure 8 Filippiada camp environment and remote location
Figure 9 Tents at Filippiada camp

2.5      Giannitsa

2.5.1       General

Camp controlled by the military.
On March 23, 2016 no volunteers’ presence.
Severe issues regarding sanitation and hygienic conditions reported on March 23, 2016.
Fire reported on February 28, 2016. Causes unknown.

2.5.2       Number of People at the Camp

Capacity: 900.
UNHCR data available on March 26, 2016: 866 people.
Refugee Aid Information data available on March 28, 2016: 880 people.
Vulnerable categories present: pregnant women, children (about 50% of the population), 2 newborn, one woman pregnant with cancer in need of urgent assistance.

2.5.3       Food

Two meals per day provided by the army.

2.5.4       Health

Overflowing waste in toilets with high risk of spreading infections and diseases.
Insects/larvae infesting the ground area of the tents.

2.5.5       Water

No information available.

2.5.6       Sanitation

Overflowing waste in toilets.

2.5.7       Shelter

Tents without flooring.

2.5.8       Environment

Insects/larvae infesting the ground area of the tents.
Tent flooring needed.

2.5.9       Photographs

Figure 10 Giannitsa tents with no flooring - Sleeping on bare, larvae-infested ground
Figure 11 Giannitsa infested ground

Figure 12 Fire of unidentified origin on February 27, 2016

2.6      Idomeni

2.6.1       General

The camp in Idomeni is located approximately 20km north of Nea Kavala. The state is absent from the camp, barring a few police officers surveying the final 100 metres leading to the «exit gate». Various incidents were reported and the safety of people is not guaranteed.
Police do not allow taxis to approach the camp, thereby putting more stress on the already exhausted people seeking the bare necessities outside of the camp.  Small fires for heating, burning wood, garbage, plastic.
UNHCR, doctors, those preparing food and more generally all those providing all kinds of aid, provide the only significant amount of aid (randomly distributed) to desperate, exhausted and ill people (many of whom are elderly and small children), living in adverse conditions.
The ethnic minority Yazidis is particularly vulnerable and people are negatively affected by the lack of protection in their daily life and in their access to basic services. In particular, they are reported to live in fear, afraid to join lines in food distribution, and subject to violent attacks by Syrian gangs at night.

2.6.2       Number of People at the Camp

Capacity: Not applicable (informal settlement).
UNHCR data available on March 26, 2016: 11,603 people.
Refugee Aid Information data available on March 28, 2016: 11,426 people.

2.6.3       Food

Reported insufficient. Part provided by volunteers.

2.6.4       Health

Cases of Hepatitis A and of diarrhea were recently detected. Hepatitis A, diarrhea and the more serious dysentery may be caused by crowding, lack of sanitation and clean water. MSF and MDM have teams in the camp. On March 18, 2016, the German Red Cross society declared that a mobile health station will be sent onsite to for support. The station will be equipped to serve 10,000 people.
According to DPA, The German Red Cross, in cooperation with the Red Cross of Finland, is on the move to come down to Idomeni with two complete field hospital units. They will include an operating room for surgery, special facilities for giving birth, a laboratory and a freezer room. The German Red Cross says the units will arrive near Idomeni on March 20, 2016 (information available on March 18 – no updates available) and will be operational in Nea Kavala and Cherso on March 22, 2016.
According to a report dated March 7, 2016, in the Greek daily To Vima, the spokeswoman for the MSF refugee mission, Vika Markolefa, warns against the danger of epidemics, “We are very concerned about the health situation. Since there are not enough toilets and showers, many people are forced to go in the fields. When it rains, faeces spreads everywhere. This is particularly tragic for children, who are always playing on the ground. We fear the outbreak of an epidemic that could spread through the water.”
Babies were delivered at the camp. Pregnant women and people with heart condition present at the camp.

2.6.5       Water

Reported insufficient running water taps.
People shower pouring water from cans, small recipients, plastic bottles.

2.6.6       Sanitation

Chemical toilets are present. The exact number of latrines is unknown, however it is reported to be insufficient for the population.

2.6.7       Shelter

No information available.

2.6.8       Environment

Few large tents with heating.
The greatest majority sleep in camping tents (no heating) or makeshift shelters, or have no shelter.

2.6.9       Photographs

Figure 13 Flooding of Idomeni camp (1)

Figure 14 Flooding of Idomeni camp (2)

Figure 15 Camping tents and laundry lines at Idomeni camp

Figure 16 Open fires for warming and cooking at Idomeni camp
Figure 17 Makeshift tent at Idomeni camp

2.7      Nea Cavala/Nea Kavala (Polykastro)

2.7.1       General

The refugee camp in Nea Kavala, accessible through the road bordering the village, and which is in close proximity to a supermarket, has been in operation since the end of February 2016. It is an open structure, without restrictions on exit. It is operated exclusively by the military, that is, there is no civilian staff from the Ministry of Interior/Migration, which creates an issue regarding whose jurisdiction the camp is under. The camp lies outside the Diavata-Idomeni axis (though very close to the latter), and very few organizations visit it, so that very few humanitarian aid materials are available. Aid not distributed following a system, as no civilian staff is available to carry out this work. Staff present (reported on March 5, 2016) consisted of 7 people in total, all military, and the lieutenant in charge of the camp (who performs his duties on a shift basis) appeared to be fully aware of his duties, responsibilities, as well as of objective restrictions, as there is no aid, infrastructure or sufficient staff available.
The ethnic minority Yazidis is particularly vulnerable and people are negatively affected by the lack of protection in their daily life and in their access to basic services. In particular, they are reported to live in fear, afraid to join lines in food distribution, and subject to violent attacks by Syrian gangs at night.

2.7.2       Number of People at the Camp

Capacity: 4,000.
UNHCR data available on March 26, 2016: 3,540 people.
Refugee Aid Information data available on March 28, 2016: 3,520 people.

2.7.3       Food

Two meals per day provided by the army.
2,538 portions (breakfast-lunch-dinner) reported distributed on March 4, 2016.

2.7.4       Health

One doctor based permanently at the camp.
According to DPA, The German Red Cross, in cooperation with the Red Cross of Finland, is on the move to come down to Idomeni with two complete field hospital units. They will include an operating room for surgery, special facilities for giving birth, a laboratory and a freezer room. The German Red Cross says the units will arrive near Idomeni on March 20, 2016 (information available on March 18 – no updates available) and will be operational in Nea Kavala and Cherso on March 22, 2016.

2.7.5       Water

No information available.

2.7.6       Sanitation

50 portable toilets.

2.7.7       Shelter

According to report dated March 4, 2016, the camp has 557 tents with capacity for 6-8 people and two rub halls. Tents have no heating and are not weather-proof.

2.7.8       Environment

Some electrical lighting in certain places, but not throughout the camp.
Upon rainy weather, parts of the site (including tents) are under water.

2.7.9       Photographs

Figure 18 Nea Kavala camp

2.8      Polykastro (EKO Gas Station)

2.8.1       General

The camp is located on the motorway, near Polykastro exit, at the EKO gas station and in the surrounding fields.
This is an informal settlement.
Very unsafe environment due to the motorway proximity and the lack of security.

2.8.2       Number of People at the Camp

Capacity: Not applicable (informal settlement).
UNHCR data available on March 26, 2016: 1,250 people.
Refugee Aid Information data available on March 28, 2016: 1,250 people.
At least 80 pregnant women.
Many women with children and no husband.
Many families and children.
Mixed ethnicities and nationalities (Syrian, Iraqi, Afghans) leading to potential tensions and threat to vulnerable categories.

2.8.3       Food

Reported provided by UNHCR/MSF teams present onsite. Three meals per day. People are satisfied with quantity and quality. Some however purchase food at the local convenience store.

2.8.4       Health

MSF tent present onsite. The first NGO to provide support here.

2.8.5       Water

No information available. It may be assumed that drinking water is provided with meals, but this could not be verified.

2.8.6       Sanitation

Approximately 50 portable toilets in addition to those inside the convenience store of the gas station.
Cold shower free of charge.
Hot shower 2 euros (provided by gas station).
Gas station responsible for cleaning the site and facilities.
Washing machines available at a charge.

2.8.7       Shelter

UNHCR and MSF tents as well as camping tents.

2.8.8       Environment

The camp is located in the area surrounding a gas station on the motorway (120kmh speed limit).
Tents are mounted on asphalt as well as on the field ground surrounding the area.

2.8.9       Photographs

Figure 19 Tents at Plykastro EKO Gas Station (1)
Figure 20 Tents at Plykastro EKO Gas Station (2)

Figure 21 Tents at Plykastro EKO Gas Station (3)

2.9      Additional Camps in Northern Greece

Limited data are available regarding the following additional camps located in Northern Greece,
·         Drosato/Drama
o        Capacity: 500.
o        479 people according to UNHCR report dated March 26, 2016
o        479 people according to Refugee Aid Information report dated March 28, 2016
·         Eleftheroupoli, Kavala
People are lodged in the Sports Hall of Eleftheroupoli, Municipality of Pangaio
o        Capacity: 200. Capacity exceeded.
o        206 people according to UNHCR report dated March 26, 2016
o        346 people according to Refugee Aid Information report dated March 28, 2016
·         Ioannina - Doliana
o        Capacity: 400.
o        207 people according to UNHCR report dated March 26, 2016
o        207 people according to Refugee Aid Information report dated March 28, 2016
·         Ioannina - Katsikas
o        Capacity: 1,500.
o        1,075 people according to UNHCR report dated March 26, 2016
o        1,075 people according to Refugee Aid Information report dated March 28, 2016
·         Konitsa
Child and youth care centre hosting unaccompanied minors
o        Capacity: 150.
o        162 people according to UNHCR report dated March 26, 2016
o        162 people according to Refugee Aid Information report dated March 28, 2016
·         Kozani (SW Thessaloniki)
o        Capacity: 400.
o        176 people according to UNHCR report dated March 26, 2016
o        188 people according to Refugee Aid Information report dated March 28, 2016
·         Nea Karvali, Municipality of Kavala
o        Capacity: 1,000.
o        748 people according to UNHCR report dated March 26, 2016
o        751 people according to Refugee Aid Information report dated March 28, 2016
·         Pieria - ParaliaSkotinas beach
o        Capacity: 190.
o        190 people according to UNHCR report dated March 26, 2016
o        190 people according to Refugee Aid Information report dated March 28, 2016
·         Pieria - Nireas camp - Kalivia Varikou
o        Capacity: 400. Capacity exceeded.
o        426 people according to UNHCR report dated March 26, 2016
o        468 people according to Refugee Aid Information report dated March 28, 2016
·         Pieria - Nea Chrani Municipal Stadium
o        Capacity: 400.
o        97 people according to UNHCR report dated March 26, 2016
o        151 people according to Refugee Aid Information report dated March 28, 2016
·         Thessaloniki port
o        Capacity: 400.
o        342 people according to UNHCR report dated March 26, 2016
o        346 people according to Refugee Aid Information report dated March 28, 2016
·         Veria/Veroia, Imathia
Aggressive protests by locals reported on March 26, 2016 against the establishment of this new camp due to receive six buses of refugees from Idomeni.
o        Capacity: 400.
o        300 people according to UNHCR report dated March 26, 2016
o        377 people according to Refugee Aid Information report dated March 28, 2016
In particular, additional information regarding the above listed camps, including their management, is currently not available.
The construction of the following camps is reported to have been cancelled,
·         Kentriko.

3            Additional Camps in Greece Mainland

3.1      Attica - Elliniko, Athens

3.1.1       General

Set up in mid-December 2015 by the Greek government in the area of the former airport in the Athens suburb of Elliniko. Since the airport was shut down in 2001, the site has mainly been used for sports events such as the 2004 Summer Olympics and includes a hockey stadium and a baseball stadium.

3.1.2       Number of People at the Camp

Baseball camp
·         UNHCR data available on March 26, 2016: 1,180 people.
·         Refugee Aid Information data available on March 28, 2016: 1,186 people.
Hockey camp
·         UNHCR data available on March 26, 2016: 1,710 people.
·         Refugee Aid Information data available on March 28, 2016: 1,647 people.
Former airport terminal
·         UNHCR data available on March 26, 2016: 1,431 people.
·         Refugee Aid Information data available on March 28, 2016: 1,482 people.

3.1.3       Health

There are no doctors.
Many people are reported sick.
In course of March 2016, a baby died of birth complications because no assistance was provided despite several requests raised by volunteers to take the woman in labour to the hospital.

3.1.4       Water

No water taps

3.1.5       Sanitation

No showers, no washrooms.
People bathe themselves and wash their clothes at the nearby beaches, in the sea water.
It is reported that there is no staff to clean the toilets and that the stench is unbearable.

3.1.6       Shelter

Ex-airport terminal, a hockey stadium, and 150-person tents set up by the army in a baseball stadium.

3.1.7       Environment

People sleep on the floor/on the ground.

3.1.8       Photographs

No photographs available.

3.2      Central Greece – Ritsona Army Base

3.2.1       General

Located in the area of an ex-army base.

3.2.2       Number of People at the Camp

UNHCR data available on March 26, 2016: 908 people.
Refugee Aid Information data available on March 28, 2016: 908 people.

3.2.3       Health

No information available.

3.2.4       Water

No running water.

3.2.5       Sanitation

No showers, no washrooms.
Chemical toilets.

3.2.6       Shelter

Tents.

3.2.7       Environment

No electricity.

3.2.8       Photographs

No photographs available.

4            Credits

4.1      Photographs and Images

Ref.
Credits/Source
Figure 1
Figure 16
Figure 19
Cosimo Calabrese/Open Borders - Sguardi Migranti
Open Borders is a collective of independent photographers whose work focus on the themes of human migration and European borders’ opening.
Figure 2
Figure 17
Fabio Viola/Open Borders - Sguardi Migranti
Open Borders is a collective of independent photographers whose work focus on the themes of human migration and European borders’ opening.
Figure 3
Figure 4
Figure 7
Credits unknown
Source: Volunteer Kilkis Idomeni
Figure 5
Figure 20
Figure 21
Live Ticker Eidomeni
Figure 6
Damian Mac Con Uladh
Figure 8
Figure 9
Katie O'Neill
Figure 10
Figure 11
Credits unknown
Figure 12
Jim Fragma
Figure 13
Figure 14
Figure 15
Figure 18
Björn Kietzmann

Research - compilation of the material for Pleiades: Simona Bonardi